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Catalog Course Descriptions

Course descriptions for ME/SA-related courses.

KEY

 No symbol: Course is ME/SA exclusive.  Course is in the original ME/SA proposal

§: Course is ME/SA exclusive.  Course is NOT in the original ME/SA proposal.  These courses are by petition, but are automatically ME/SA courses.  These courses will no longer be by petition once the ME/SA faculty revise the ME/SA major.

 ‡: Course is by petition

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANT 142. Peoples of the Middle East (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 2.  Peoples of the Middle East (including North Africa). Discussions of class relations, kinship organization, sex/gender systems, religious beliefs and behavior, ethnic relations, political systems. Impact of world systems, political and religious movements and social change. (Former course 136.) GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | SS, WC, WE. Suad Joseph      

ANT 145. Performance, Embodiment, and Space in South Asia (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 2 or consent of instructor. South Asian cultures and societies with a focus on performance, embodiment, and space from several disciplinary fields. Topics may include colonialism, nationalism, religious traditions, media, popular culture, cities, social movements, modernity, body‐cultures, identity, gender, and diasporas. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt.—III. Smriti Srinivas


ARABIC

ARB 001. Elementary Arabic 1 (5)

Introduction to basic Arabic. Interactive and integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including the alphabet and basic syntax. Focus on standard Arabic with basic skills in spoken Egyptian and/or one other colloquial dialect. Shayma Hassouna 

ARB 001 A. Intensive Elem Arabic (15)

Lecture/discussion—15 hours. Special 12-week accelerated, intensive summer session course that  combines the work of courses 1, 2, and 3. Introduction to Modern Standard Arabic through development of all language skills in a cultural context with emphasis on communicative proficiency. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 1, 2, or 3. Not offered every year.—IV. (IV.)

ARB 002. Elementary Arabic 2 (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or with instructor's consent after student takes all components of the course 1 final exam. Continues introduction to basic Arabic from course 1. Interactive and integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including syntax. Focus on standard Arabic and limited use of spoken Egyptian and/or one other colloquial dialect. S. Hassouna  

ARB 003. Elementary Arabic 3 (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 and 2 or with consent of instructor after taking all components of the final exam for course 1 and 2. Continues introduction to basic Arabic from courses 1 and 2. Interactive and integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including syntax. Focus on standard Arabic with limited use of spoken Egyptina and /or one other colloquial dialect. Shayma Hassouna  

ARB 021. Intermediate Arabic 21 (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 1, 2, 3 or with consent of instructor after taking all parts of course 3 final exam. Builds on courses 1, 2, and 3. Interactive and integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including idiomatic expression. Focus on standard Arabic with limited use of Egyptian and/or one other colloquial dialect.  Shayma Hassouna  

ARB 022. Intermediate Arabic 22 (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 21 or with consent of instructor after taking all parts of course final 21 exam. Continues from course 21. Interactive and integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including idiomatic expression. Focus on standard Arabic with limited use of Egyptian and/or one other colloquial dialect.  Shayma Hassouna

ARB 023. Intermediate Arabic 23 (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 22 or with consent of instructor after completing all parts of the final exams for courses 21 and 22. Continues from courses 21 and 22. Interactive and integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including idiomatic expression. Focus on standard Arabic with limited use of Egyptian and/or one other colloquial dialect. Shayma Hassouna

§ ARB 121 Advanced Arabic (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 23 or consent of instructor. Review, refinement, and development of skills learned in intermediate Arabic through work with texts, video, and audio on cultural and social issues. Integrated approach to reading, writing, listening, speaking primarily standard Arabic, with limited use of one colloquial dialect. May be repeated two times for credit based on different readings. GE credit: AH, WC.—I. (I.) Sharlet

§ ARB 122. Advanced Arabic (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 121 or permission of instructor. Continuation of course 121. Further development of advanced skills in reading, listening, writing, and speaking standard Arabic through work with texts, video, and audio on cultural and social issues. Limited use of one colloquial dialect.—II. (II.) Radwan, Sharlet

§ ARB 123. Advanced Arabic (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 122 or permission of instructor. Continuation of course 122. Further development of advanced skills in reading, listening, writing, and speaking standard Arabic through work with texts, video, and audio on cultural and social issues. Limited use of one colloquial dialect.—III. (III.) Radwan, Sharlet

§ ARB 140. A Story for a Life: The Arabian Nights (4) (cross-listed with MSA 121A—Jocelyn Sharlet plans to change the cross-listing from ARB to COM)

In-depth investigation of the best-known work of pre-modern Arabic literature, taught in translation.

‡ ARB 198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in advanced Arabic. Materials may include al-Kitaab Part Two or Three, news articles and broadcasts, short stories, poetry, novels, essays, scripture, prophetic traditions, audio recordings, and television and film. May be repeated four times for credit if content differs. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)


ART HISTORY

§ AHI 001 E. Islamic Art and Architecture (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to the art and architecture of the Islamic world including the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and South Asia, from the 7th century CE to the 20th. GE credit: ArtHum, Div | AH, VL, WC.—(I.) Watenpaugh

§ AHI 155. The Islamic City (4)

Lecture—3 hour; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1E recommended. Introduction to the urban history of the Islamic world. Includes critical study of the historiography of the Islamic city, development of urban form, institutions and rituals, and analysis of selected themes. GE Credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—(II.) Watenpaugh

§ AHI 156.  Arts of the Islamic Book (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1E recommended. Critical study of the arts of the luxury book in the pre-modern Islamic world. Representation in Islam, the relationship of word and image, the discipline of calligraphy, aesthetics and representation in Persianate painting. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Watenpaugh


ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES

§ ASA 150 F. South Asian American History, Culture, and Politics (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 1, 2, 3, or 4 or consent of instructor. South Asian American experiences, focusing on the histories, cultures, and politics of Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and Sri Lankan communities in the U.S. Interdisciplinary approaches to migration, labor, gender, racialization, ethnicity, youth, community mobilization. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, SocSci—I. (II.) Maira


CLASSICS

‡ CLA 001. The Ancient Near East and Early Greece: 3000-500 B.C.E. (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Introduction to the literature, art, and social and political institutions of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Palestine, and early Greece from 3000 to 500 B.C.E. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—(II.) Popescu

CLA 098 (PER 021) Intermediate Persian (5) 

Staff (lecturer is being hired now)
Integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading and writing in Persian at the intermediate level, beginning with a review of the material included in elementary Persian courses, in the context of Persian culture and society. Currently available as CLA 98 pending approval of Persian 21. Open to students with experience in Persian. See Jocelyn Sharlet jcsharlet@ucdavis.edu for placement. AH, WC

 

CINEMA AND TECHNOCULTURAL STUDIES

§ CTS 146 A. Modern Iranian Film (4) (cross-listed with MSA 131A)

Iranian cinema of the 20th century in the context of profound cultural and social changes in Iran especially since the Iranian Revolution. Productions by representative directors such as Kiarostami, Makhmalbaf, Bahram Beizaie are included. Knowledge of Persian not required.


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COM 053 B. Literature of India and Southeast Asia (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to representative masterpieces of South Asia with readings from such works as the Mahabharata and Ramayana, The Cloud Messenger, Shakuntala, The Little Clay Cart, and the stories and poems of both ancient and modern India and Southeast Asia. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt. Venkatesan

COM 053 C. Literatures of the Islamic World (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. This course will explore major works of world literature in translation from Arabic and Persian as well as Urdu and Ottoman Turkish. We will read legends, stories and poetry from diverse genres that offer perspectives on storytelling and poetry, and on the individual, the family, the journey, spirituality, ethics, gender and government. We will examine literary texts in their historical context. We will also investigate the arts of the book and the relationship between text and performance. J.Sharlet

 

§ COM 148. Mystical Literatures of South Asia and the Middle East (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Exploration of the comparative mystical literatures of major religious traditions, with a focus on those produced in South Asia and the Middle East, although including other traditions. Offered in alternate years. GE Credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—I. Venkatesan

§ COM 155. Classical Literature of the Islamic World 6001800 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Subject A or consent of instructor. Major classical texts of the Islamic world with attention to intermingling of diverse cultural influences and historical context. Includes epic, romance, lyric, mystical narrative, fairy tales, essays. Texts from Arabic, Persian, Ottoman Turkish, and Urdu literature. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—(II.) Sharlet

§ COM 156. The Ramayana (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Exploration of the Indian epic, Ramayana, through the lens of literature, performance, and visual art. Emphasis on the text's diversity and its contemporary global relevance. Topics include Ramayanas in Southeast Asia, and in various South Asian diaspora communities. Offered in alternate years. GE Credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—(II.) Venkatesan

COM 166. Literatures of the Modern Middle East (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Major translated works in modern Middle Eastern and North African Literature, including Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish. Social and historical formation, with topics such as conflict and coexistence, journeys, and displaced people, gender and family. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—I. (I.) Radwan, Sharlet


HEBREW

HEB 001. Elementary Hebrew (5)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; laboratory—1 hour. Speaking, listening, comprehension, reading and writing fundamentals of modern Hebrew. (Students who have successfully completed, with a C‐ or better, Hebrew 2 or 3 in the 10th or higher grade in high school may receive unit credit for this course on a P/ NP grading basis only. Although a passing grade will be charged to the student’s P/NP option, no petition is required. All other students will receive a letter grade unless a P/NP petition is filed.)—I. (I.)

HEB 002. Elementary Hebrew (5)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; laboratory—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 1 or the equivalent. Speaking, listening, comprehension, reading and writing fundamentals of modern Hebrew.—II. (II.)

HEB 003. Elementary Hebrew (5)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; laboratory—1 hour Prerequisite: course 2 or the equivalent. Speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing fundamentals of modern Hebrew.—III. (III.)

HEB 021. Intermediate Mod Hebrew I (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 3 or consent of instructor. Development and refinement of grammar, composition, and language skills required for reading literary texts and conversing about contemporary topics at an advanced level. History of the Hebrew language. Not open to students who have taken courses 100 or 100A.—I. (I.)

HEB 022. Intermediate Modern Hebrew II (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 21 or consent of instructor. Continued development and refinement of grammar, composition, and language skills required for reading literary texts and conversing about contemporary topics at an advanced level. History of the Hebrew language. Not open to students who have taken course 101 or 100B.—II. (II.)

HEB 023. Intermediate Modern Hebrew III (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 22 or consent of instructor. Continued development and refinement of grammar, composition, and language skills required for reading literary texts and conversing about contemporary topics at an advanced level. History of the Hebrew language. Further development of writing and translating skills. Not open to students who have taken course 100C or 102.—III. (III.)

HEB 100AN. Advanced Modern Hebrew I (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 23 or consent of instructor. Students who have taken course 100A as 2nd year Hebrew may take course 100AN. Third year Hebrew. Advanced grammar and composition. Focus on reading of literary texts, oral skills and accuracy in writing. GE credit: AH.—I. (I.)

HEB 100BN. Advanced Modern Hebrew II (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 100AN or consent of instructor. Students who have taken course 100B as 2nd year Hebrew may take course 100BN. Third year Hebrew. Advanced grammar and composition. Focus on reading of literary texts, oral skills and accuracy in writing. GE credit: AH.—II. (II.)

HEB 100CN. Advanced Modern Hebrew III (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 100BN. Students who have taken course 100C as 2nd year Hebrew may take course 100CN. Third year Hebrew. Advanced grammar and composition. Focus on reading of literary texts, oral skills and accuracy in writing. GE credit: AH.—III. (III.)


HINDIURDU

HIN 001. Elementary Hindi/Urdu I (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. An introduction to Hindi and Urdu in which students will learn vocabulary and grammar in both Devanagari and Urdu scripts, and will practice skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening.—I. (I.) Chauhan

HIN 002. Elementary Hindi/Urdu II (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 1. An introduction to Hindi and Urdu in which students will learn vocabulary and grammar in both Devanagari and Urdu scripts, and will practice skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening.—II. (II.) Chauhan

HIN 003. Elementary Hindi/Urdu III (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 2. An introduction to Hindi and Urdu in which students will learn vocabulary and grammar in both Devanagari and Urdu scripts, and will practice skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening.—III. (III.) Chauhan

HIN 021. Intermediate Hindi/Urdu (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 3. An intermediate level course for students who have completed Elementary Hindi/Urdu or the equivalent. Students will continue to practice their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Hindi and Urdu.—I. (I.) Chauhan

HIN 022. Intermediate Hindi/Urdu II (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 21. An intermediate level course where students will continue to practice their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Hindi and Urdu.—II. (II.) Chauhan

HIN 023. Intermediate Hindi/Urdu III (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 22. An intermediate level course where students will continue to practice their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Hindi and Urdu.—III. (III.) Chauhan


HISTORY

HIS 006. Introduction to the Middle East (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of the major social, economic, political and cultural transformations in the Middle East from the rise of Islam (c. 600 A.D.) to the present, emphasizing themes in religion and culture, politics and society. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Teczan

HIS 008. History of Indian Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of Indian civilization from the rise of cities (ca. 2000 B.C.) to the present, emphasizing themes in religion, social and political organization, and art and literature that reflect cultural interaction and change. GE credit: ArtHum, Div.—III. (III.)

HIS 011: History of the Jewish People from Biblical Times (4)

Lecture- 3 hours, Discussion- 1 hour. History of the Jewish people from its roots in ancient Israel, through the classical and rabbinical periods, their relations with early Christianity and Islam, their transition to modernity, their emancipation, and into the  modern world. GE Credit: AH, DD, VL, WC, WE (I) I. Miller

HIS 011. History of the Jewish People in the Modern World (4)

Lecture- 3 hours, Discussion- 1 hour. Histories and cultures of the Jews since 1492. Topics include: the making of Jewish diasporas, roots of antisemitism, the Holocaust in images and texts, changing ideas of the self, Jews in America, contemporary visions of the Jewish past. GE Credit: AH, DD, VL, WC, WE (I) I. Miller

HIS 102 Q. Undergraduate Proseminar in History: India (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. (A) Ancient; (B) Medieval; (D) Modern Europe to 1815; (E) Europe since 1815; (F) Russia; (G) China to 1800; (H) China since 1800; (I) Britain; (J) Latin America since 1810; (K) American History to 1787; (L) United States, 1787‐1896; (M) United States since 1896; (N) Japan; (O) Africa; (P) Christianity and Culture in Europe, 50‐1850; (Q) India; (R) Muslim Societies; (X) Comparative History, selected topics in cultural, political, economic, and social history that deal comparatively with more than one geographic field. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

§ HIS 102 R. Undergraduate Proseminar in History: Muslim Societies (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. (A) Ancient; (B) Medieval; (D) Modern Europe to 1815; (E) Europe since 1815; (F) Russia; (G) China to 1800; (H) China since 1800; (I) Britain; (J) Latin America since 1810; (K) American History to 1787; (L) United States, 1787‐1896; (M) United States since 1896; (N) Japan; (O) Africa; (P) Christianity and Culture in Europe, 50‐1850; (Q) India; (R) Muslim Societies; (X) Comparative History, selected topics in cultural, political, economic, and social history that deal comparatively with more than one geographic field. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

§ HIS 112 C. Jews Among Muslims (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. History of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam from the time of the Prophet Muhammad to the present day. GE credit: SS, WC, WE.—I. (I.) Miller

HIS 112 C. Jews Among Muslims (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. History of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam from the time of the Prophet Muhammad to the present day. GE credit: SS, WC, WE.—I. (I.) Miller

HIS 113. History of Modern Israel (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Topics include the rise and fall of utopian Zionism, the century‐long struggle between Jews and Arabs, the development of modern Hebrew culture, the conflict between religious and secular Jews, and the nature of Israel’s multicultural society. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—II. (II.)

§ HIS 115 F. History of North, Horn, Sudan and Nile valley (North and NorthEast Africa) (4)

Lecture—4 hours; term paper. This course shall investigate the history of the north and northeast regions of continental Africa, encompassing the Mediterranean Coast, Maghreb, Sahara, Horn of Africa, the Nile Valley and the Sudan, covering the ancient period to the present. May be repeated up to four units for credit when instructor differs. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Miller

HIS 115 F. History Modern North Africa, 1800 to the Present (4)

Lecture—4 hours; term paper. History of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya (the Maghrib), 1800 to the present. Topics include conquest and pacification, reform movements, the rise of nationalism, decolonization, state capitalism, economic liberalization, Islamism, democratization and human rights, the interplay of history and memory.  GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Miller

HIS 190 A. Middle Eastern History I: The Rise of Islam, 600-1000 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the disintegration of the Abbasid Caliphate; the formative centuries of a civilization. Politics and religion, conquest and conversion, arts and sciences, Christians, Jews and Muslims, gender and sexuality, orthodoxy and heterodoxy. Offered in alternate years. E credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Tezcan

HIS 190 B. Middle Eastern History II: The Age of the Crusades, 1001-1400 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history during the age of the Crusades and Mongol invasions. The idea of holy war, the Crusades, the Mongols as the bearers of Chinese arts, nomads and sedentary life, feudalism, mysticism, slavery, women in the medieval Middle East. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Tezcan

HIS 190 C. Middle Eastern History III: The Ottomans, 1401-1730 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history from the foundation of the Ottoman Empire on the borderlands of Byzantine Anatolia through its expansion into Europe, Asia, and Africa, creating a new cultural synthesis including the Arab, Greek, Islamic, Mongol, Persian, Slavic, and Turkish traditions. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Tezcan

§ HIS 190 D. Middle Eastern History IV: Safavids Iran, 1300-1720 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Middle Eastern history focusing on Safavid Empire (present‐day Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, up to Georgia), beginning with the origins of the dynasty as a powerful religious family, to the establishment of the Empire, focusing on Social, Religious, Economic, and Political History. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—II. Anooshahr

HIS 193 A. History of the Modern Middle East, 1750-1914 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 6 recommended. Transformation of state and society within the Middle East from 1750 to 1914 under pressure of the changing world economy and European imperialism. Themes include colonialism, Orientalism, Arab intellectual renaissance, Islamic reform, state‐ formation, role of subaltern groups. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.—El Shakry

HIS 193 B. History of the Modern Middle East from 1914 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 6 recommended. The Middle East from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Themes include the legacy of imperialism, cultural renaissance, the World Wars, nationalism, Palestine/Israel, Islamic revival, gender, revolutionary movements, politics of oil and war, cultural modernism, exile and diaspora. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.—II. El Shakry

§ HIS 193 C. Environment and Development in the Middle East (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. Examines Middle East environment and human use of nature over last 10,000 years. Discussion of colonial and contemporary environment and development planning and politics. Case studies include Egypt, the Maghreb, Palestine/Israel on rivers, desertification, national parks indigenous knowledge, etc. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH, SS.—Davis

§ HIS 193 D. History of Modern Iran 1850-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 6 recommended. Modern Iran from the mid 19th century to the present. Themes include the legacy of imperialism, cultural renaissance, the World Wars, nationalism, modernization, Islamic revival, gender, revolutionary movements, politics of oil and war. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE. Anooshahr

HIS 196 A. Medieval India (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of history of India in the millennium preceding arrival of British in the eighteenth century, focusing on interaction of the civilizations of Hinduism and Islam and on the changing nature of the state. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt. Sudipta Sen

HIS 196 B. Modern India (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of South Asian history from arrival of the British in the eighteenth century to formation of new independent states—India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan—in the twentieth century. GE credit: Soc‐ Sci, Div, Wrt.  Sudipta Sen

 

MIDDLE EAST/SOUTH ASIA STUDIES

§ MSA 092. Internship in Middle East/South Asia Studies

Internship. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Work experience on and off campus in all subject areas offered as part of the ME/SA Studies program. Internship supervised by a member of the ME/SA faculty. May be repeated for credit up to 15 units. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III, IV. (I, II, III, IV.)

§ MSA 098. Directed Group Study (15 units)

Prerequisite‐Consent of instructor (P/NP grading only)

§ MSA 099. Special Study (15 Units)

For undergraduates: Prerequisite‐ consent of instructor (P/NP grading only)

MSA 100. Middle East and South Asia: Comparative Perspectives (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Ethnographic and historical points of intersection and divergence in various aspects of the Middle East and South Asia in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial societies. Anthropological, historical, and theoretical debates surrounding the region. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)  Sen, Tezcan, Anooshahr

§ MSA 111 A. Great Cities of the Arab Middle East and South Asia (4)

In-depth examination of the great cities of North Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia as cultural and historical artifacts. Topics include: the Islamic city, processes of modernity, and representations that reinforce imagination, memory and personal identity. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt, WE, AH, WC. Miller.

§ MSA 112. History of South Asian Islam (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Comparative study of Muslim communities of South Asia. Commonalities in cultural identity and historical experience. Rise and spread of Islam, comparative history of Islamic Empires, colonial rule, and post-colonial nationalism. Not offered every year.—II. Sen

§ MSA 121 A. A Story for a Life: The Arabian Nights (4) (cross-listed with ARB 140—Jocelyn Sharlet plans to change the cross-listing to COM)

Explore the depiction of government, ethics, reform, resistance and rebellion in Shahnameh: The Persian Book of Kings by Ferdowsi (d. 1020 CE), tr. Dick Davis. Students will analyze the legend’s portrayal of rulers, rebels, women, warriors, advisers and religious officials in the quest for good government. We will explore this work in the development of ancient Persian legend and Islamic-era literature, including Ferdowsi’s depiction of the Iranian creation story and legendary kings, the rise and fall of the Sasanian Empire (224-651 CE), Zoroastrianism, Christianity, and Alexander the Great. We will examine the legend’s nuanced portrayal of interaction between the Persians and the Turks, Arabs, Armenians, Greeks, Slavs, Indians and Chinese peoples who lived among the Persians or in other states and empires of Eurasia and the Mediterranean region. Ferdowsi is a keen observer of the benefits and problems of empire in this early stage of globalization. 

§ MSA 122 A. Themes in the Arabic Novel (4)

Select modern Arabic fiction (novels and short stories) in translation. Thematically connected readings supplemented by non-fictional writings when appropriate. May be repeated for credit if theme and readings of the course change.

§ MSA 131 A. Modern Iranian Film (4) (cross-listed with CTS 146A)

Iranian cinema of the 20th century in the context of profound cultural and social changes in Iran especially since the Iranian Revolution. Productions by representative directors such as Kiarostami, Makhmalbaf, Bahram Beizaie are included. Knowledge of Persian not required. GE Credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt, WE, WC, OL, VL, MSA Faculty.

MSA 150. Women & Islamic Discourses (4) (cross-listed with WMS 185)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: Women’s Studies 50 or comparable course. Introduction to the debates/discourses about women and Islam. Transformations in debates/discourses in colonial and postcolonial periods in the Middle East & South Asia. Comparative study of debates/discourses on family, work, law, sexuality, religion, comportment, human rights, feminist and religious movements. Not offered every year. (Same course as Women’s Studies 185.)—Joseph

§ MSA 151 A. Modern Iranian Society and Culture (4)

In-depth investigation of modern Iranian society and culture.  Exploration of structures of Iranian society: family, gender, religion, minorities, economy, politics, and state.  Iran’s role in the globalizing world, and the role of Iranian diasporas.  Examination of approaches to the study of modern Iranian society and culture.

GE Credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt, WE, WC, OL, VL, MSA Faculty.

MSA 180. Topics in Middle East and South Asian Studies (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Comparative perspective on the Middle East and South Asia. Topics may include modernity, religious traditions, colonialism, subalternity and social movements, gender and sexuality, history and memory, science and development, ritual and performance, public culture, diasporas. May be repeated one time for credit. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

§ MSA 181 A. Topics In Regional ME/SA Studies: Iranian Studies (4)

Iranian/Persianate literature, history, culture, politics, religion and economy.

§ MSA 181 B. Topics in Regional ME/SA Studies: India/South Asia Studies (4)

Indian/South Asian literature, history, culture, politics, religion and economy.

§ MSA 181 C. Topics in Regional ME/SA Studies: Arab Studies (4)

Arab literature, history, culture, politics, religion and economy.

§ MSA 182 A.  Proseminar in ME/SA Studies: Iranian Studies (4)

Advanced topics in Iranian/Persianate literature, history, culture, politics, religion and economy.

§ MSA 182 B.  Proseminar in ME/SA Studies: India/South Asia Studies (4)

Advanced topics in Indian/South Asian literature, history, culture, politics, religion and economy.

§ MSA 182 C.  Proseminar in ME/SA Studies: Arab Studies (4)

Advanced topics in Arab literature, history, culture, politics, religion and economy.

§ MSA 192. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3‐36 hours. Prerequisite: course 100. Supervised internship on and off campus in the area of Middle East and South Asia Studies. May be repeated for up to 12 units of credit. (P/NP grading only.)

§ MSA 194 H. Special Study for Honors Students (1-5)

Prerequisite: open only to majors of senior standing who qualify for honors program; consent of instructor. Independent study of a problem in Middle East/South Asian studies involving the writing of an honors thesis.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

§ MSA 198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: course 100. (P/NP grading only.)

§ MSA 199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: course 100. (P/NP grading only.)


MUSIC

§ MUS 129 B. Musics of Africa, Middle East, Indian Subcontinent (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 11 or 3A-3B. Survey of music cultures with special emphasis on the role of music in society and on the elements of music (instruments, theory, genres and form, etc.). Introduction to ethnomusicological theory, methods, approaches. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC, WE.

§  MUS 148. Hindustani Vocal Ensemble (2)

Rehearsal—2 hours. Basics of Hindustani music through theory and practice. Fundamentals of raga (mode) and tala (rhythms) with special emphasis on improvisation, a central feature of khyal (singing style). Five ragas each quarter. May be repeated up to six times for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Sahai

 

PERSIAN

PER 001 Elementary Persian (5) 
Staff (lecturer is being hired now)
Integrated introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Persian, beginning with a focus on conversation, in the context of Persian culture and society. Currently available as CLA 98 pending approval of Persian 1. Open to all students. AH, WC

Prerequisite: None.

 

PER 21 Intermediate Persian (5) 

Staff (lecturer is being hired now)
Integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading and writing in Persian at the intermediate level, beginning with a review of the material included in elementary Persian courses, in the context of Persian culture and society. Currently available as CLA 98 pending approval of Persian 21. Open to students with experience in Persian. See Jocelyn Sharlet jcsharlet@ucdavis.edu for placement.AH, WC
 

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

§  POL 135. International Politics of the Middle East (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 3 or consent of instructor. Restricted to upper division standing. International politics of the Middle East as a microcosm of world politics. The Middle East as a regional system. Domestic and International Politics in the Middle East. Changing Political Structures in the Middle East. Superpower involvement in the Middle East. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.

§  POL 136. The ArabIsraeli Conflict (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 3 or International Relations 1. Restricted to upper division standing. Causes, course, and implications of Arab-Israeli conflict. Competing Israeli and Arab narratives, politics of force, diplomacy. Domestic politics and A-I conflict, the superpowers and the A-I conflict, A-I conflict and world politics, potential solutions. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.


RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RST 012. The Emergence of Judaism, Christianity and Islam / Abrahamic Relgions (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. History of religion in the ancient Near East and Mediterranean, from the Persian period through the rise of Islam. Emphasis on historical and social contexts of the formation of new traditions, in particular Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, OL, WC, WE.—I, II. (I, II.)

RST 021. Hebrew Scriptures (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Selected texts from the Hebrew Scriptures (Genesis—II Chronicles) and review of modern scholarship on the texts from a variety of perspectives (historical, literary, sociological, psychological). Course work is based on an English translation and no knowledge of Hebrew is required. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—I. (I.)

RST 023. Introduction to Judaism (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Introduction to the study of religion using examples from the rituals, art and holy texts of Judaism. No prior knowledge of either Judaism or the study of religion is necessary. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH, DD, WC, WE.—II. (II.)

§ RST 030. Religions of South Asia (4)

Lecture – 3 hours. Introduction to South Asian religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Jainism and Sikhism. Traces historical developments from Vedic texts and their ascetic reformulation by sages such as Yajnavalkya, Siddhartha Gautama, and Mahavira into our global present. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC, WE.—I, II. (I, II.) Elmore, Venkatesan

RST 040. New Testament (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. New Testament literature from critical, historical, and theological perspectives. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—I. (I.) Chin

RST 060. Introduction to Islam (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Introduction to topics central to the Islamic tradition. Muhammad, the Qur’an, Islamic law, theology, philosophy, cosmology, worship, and mysticism. Race and gender in Islam, Islamic revival, and varying experiences of Islam in different historical and cultural settings. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—(I.) Tezcan

RST 065 C. The Qur’an and Its Interpretation (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. The Qur’an, its history, its various functions in the lives of Muslims, and its different interpretations. Quranic themes such as God and humankind, nature and revelation, eschatology and Satan. Islam and other religions; women, gender, and sexuality. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—(III.) Tezcan

RST 067. Modern Hinduism (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Historical survey of modern Hinduism from the early nineteenth century to the present. Topics include Rammohun Roy, Sir William Jones, and Mahatma Gandhi, nationalism, post-colonialism and diasporic religion. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.—II. Elmore, Venkatesan

RST 068. Hinduism (4)

Lecture—3 hours; writing. Hindu tradition from ancient to modern times. Multiplicity of religious forms within Hinduism with mention of Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism and their relation to the mainstream of Hindu religion. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC, WE.—I.

RST 069. Introduction to Hindu Mythology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of the major narrative traditions within Hinduism, including epic literature and local stories in oral, textual, visual and performative forms. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC, WE.—Venkatesan

§ RST 156. Religion and the Performing Arts in India (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 30, 68, or consent of the instructor. Survey of religion and performing arts in India. Emphasis on the influence of colonialism, nationalism, and regionalism on the history of Indian performing arts. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—II. Venkatesan

§ RST 157. Hindu Women and Goddesses (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Hindu goddesses and the religious lives of Hindu women in India and the diaspora. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC, WE.—I, III. (I, III.) Venkatesan

RST 160. Introduction to Islamic Thought (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 60 recommended. The development of Islamic thought from the first centuries of Islam to the eighteenth century. Theology, philosophy, ethics, Sufism, historiography, political theory, fundamentalism, al‐Farabi, al‐Ghazzali, Ibn Rushd, Tusi, Ibn al‐Arabi, Rumi, Molla Sadra, Ibn Khaldun, Ibn Abd al‐Wahhab. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—II. Tezcan

RST 161. Modern Islam (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 60 or consent of instructor. The response of Islam to modernity: secularism, reformism, fundamentalism. Islam and imperialism, women, media and immigration. Islamic modernism, political Islam, Islam in Europe and America. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—II. (II.)

RST 162. Introduction to Islamic Law (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 60 recommended. The development of Islamic law in the formative centuries of Islam, ca. 600‐1000, as well as its adaptation to changing economic, social, and political conditions in subsequent periods. Legal schools, legal theory, the Shari’a, reformist movements, human rights. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div. Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—II. Tezcan

RST 163. The Social Life of Islam (4)

Lecture – 3 hours Introduction to culture and social life in Muslim societies. Focus on the plurality of traditions in Muslim faith, reason, and everyday practice. Special attention to Muslim rituals, ethical values, verbal genres, family life, sexuality and veiling, and youth culture. —II. Miller

§ RST 165. Islam in Asia (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Islam as a lived religion in the Indian sub-continent, Central Asia, China, and Southeast Asia. Emphasis is on primary sources studied comparatively and historically. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—III.

§ RST 167. Iraq (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Origins, causes and ethical challenges of conditions in Iraq; larger historical, cultural and ethical dimensions of mass violence, war, liberation, neocolonialism, terrorism and resistance.—III. (III.) Watenpaugh

RST 170. Buddhism (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Buddhism in its pan‐Asian manifestations, from its beginning in India to its development in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia, Central Asia, China and Japan; teachings and practices, socio‐ political and cultural impact. Offered in alternate years.—III. GE credit: AH, VL, WC.—III. Elmore




WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES

WMS 178 A. Transnationalism and Writing by Women of Color (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: one course in Women’s Studies, or consent of instructor. Writings by women of color in a transnational framework, understood in their cultural, socio‐economic, and historical contexts. The interrelation among gender, writing, nationalism, and transnationalism, with focus on women’s writing in specific geographic/national locations and their diasporas: (A) The Arab World; (B) Asia; (C) The Caribbean; (D) Africa; (E) Diasporic Women Writers in Europe; (F) Topics on Women Writers of Color. Not offered every year. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—Constable, Ho, Joseph, Kuhn, Mena, Nettles-Barcelón

WMS 184. Gender in the Arab World (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 50. Examination of the history, culture, and social / political / economic dynamics of gender relations and gendering in the Arab world. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | SS, WC, WE.—II. Joseph

WMS 185. Women & Islamic Discourses (4) (cross-listed with MSA 150)

Introduction to the debates / discourses about women and Islam. Transformations in debates / discourses in colonial and postcolonial periods in the Middle East & South Asia. Comparative study of debates / discourses on family, work, law, sexuality, religion, comportment, human rights, feminist and religious movements. GE credit: AH or SS, WC.—Joseph

 

 

 

COURSES BY PETITION

Accepted for ME/SA Credit on a Case-By-Case Basis

ANTHROPOLOGY

‡ ANT 124. Religion in Society and Culture (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 2. Discussion of anthropological theories of religion with emphasis on non‐literate societies. Survey of shamanism, magic and witchcraft, ritual and symbols, and religious movements. Extensive discussion of ethnographic examples and analysis of social functions of religious institutions. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.

ANT 127. Urban Anthropology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 2 or consent of instructor. Survey of approaches to urban living: political structures, organization of labor, class relations, world views. The evolution of urban life and its contemporary dilemmas. Cross-cultural comparisons discussed through case studies. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | SS, WC, WE.




ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES

ASA 189 E.  Topics in Asian American Studies: Comparative Race Studies (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 1, 2, or 3 and upper division standing, or consent of instructor. Intensive treatment of a topic in Asian American Studies. (A) History; (B) Culture; (C) Health; (D) Policy and Community; (E) Comparative Race Studies; (F) Asian and Asian American Studies; (G) Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality; (H) Society and Institutions; (I) Politics and Social Movements. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Not offered every year. GE credit: ACGH, AH or SS, DD, OL, WE.




COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

‡ COM 006. Myths and Legends (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to the comparative study of myths and legends, excluding those of Greece and Rome, with readings from Near Eastern, Teutonic, Celtic, Indian, Japanese, Chinese, African and Central American literary sources. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—I, II. (I, II.) McLean, Venkatesan

COM 145. Representations of the City (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; writing. Exploration of the representation of the city in major translated literary texts from a variety of literary traditions and periods. Emphasis on the diversity of urban experience in literature. Topics include public and private space, memory, and gender. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—I. Radwan, Sharlet

COM 151. Colonial and Postcolonial Experience in Literature (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: completion of Subject A requirement and at least one course in literature. A literary introduction to the cultural issues of colonialism and postcolonialism through reading, discussing and writing on narratives which articulate diverse points of view. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—II. (III.) Larsen, Radwan




RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RST 001 E. Topics in Comparative Religion: Fundamentalism (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to comparative religion, focusing on a particular theme in a number of religious traditions: (A) Pilgrimage; (B) Death and After-life; (C) Sacrifice; (D) Conversion; (E) Fundamentalism; (F) Contemporary Religion. Not available to those who have taken course 3A. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—I, II, III, IV. (I, II, III, IV.)

RST 131. Genocide

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course from courses 1, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3E or permission of instructor. Comparative and critical study of the modern phenomenon of genocide from religious, ethical and historical perspectives. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div.—(I.) Watenpaugh




SOCIOLOGY

SOC 146. Sociology of Religion (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour or term paper or research project. Relationship between social structures and religions. The social setting of the major world religions. Religious innovators and institutionalization (churches, sects, cults). Secularization in the modern world and the rise of secular ideologies. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | SS.




WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES

‡ 185. Women & Islamic Discourses (4) (cross-listed with MSA 150)

Introduction to the debates / discourses about women and Islam. Transformations in debates / discourses in colonial and postcolonial periods in the Middle East & South Asia. Comparative study of debates / discourses on family, work, law, sexuality, religion, comportment, human rights, feminist and religious movements. Suad Joseph

WMS 184. Gender in the Arab World (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 50. Examination of the history, culture, and social / political / economic dynamics of gender relations and gendering in the Arab world. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | SS, WC, WE.—II. Joseph

 

 


 

Courses to be submitted –

MSA131B/ANT?/CTS? -  Modern South Asian Cinema  -Smriti

MSA131E/HIS?/CTS? – Modern Arab Cinema - Omnia

MSA131D/HIS?/CTS?- Modern Turkish Cinema - Baki

108      ME/SA Core Courses

11        ME/SA By Petition Courses

This is Sliced Diazo Plone Theme