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"Dalit Bombay: Stigma, Subalternity, and the Social Life of (Outcaste) Labor"

A Faculty Development Seminar
When May 27, 2011
from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM
Where 224 Young Hall
Contact Name
Contact Phone 530-754-4926
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2011-05-27 - Anupama RaoAnupama Rao is an Associate Professor with the Department of History, Barnard College & Columbia University

The seminar will take place on Friday, May 27, from 12:00 to 1:30 pm, in 224 Young Hall

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Anupama Rao's research and teaching interests are in the history of anticolonialism; gender and sexuality studies; caste and race; historical anthropology, social theory, and colonial genealogies of human rights and humanitarianism. 


Her book, The Caste Question (University of California Press, 2009) theorizes caste subalternity, with specific focus on the role of anti-caste thought (and its thinkers) in producing alternative genealogies of political subject-formation through the vernacularization of political universals. She has also written on the themes of colonialism and humanitarianism, and on non-Western histories of gender and sexuality. Recent publications include: Discipline and the Other Body (Duke University Press, 2006); “Death of a Kotwal: Injury and the Politics of Recognition,” Subaltern Studies XII; Violence, Vulnerability and Embodiment (co-editor, special issues of Gender and History, 2004), and Gender and Caste: Issues in Indian Feminism (Kali for Women, 2003). She is currently working on a project tentatively entitled Dalit Bombay, on the relationship between caste political culture and everyday life in colonial and postcolonial Bombay.

 

The Faculty Development Seminar is co-sponsored by Middle East/South Asia Studies, History, Religious Studies, and Cultural Studies.

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