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Black Orientalism: Genesis, Purpose, and Significance for American

Religious Studies Program presents Sherman Jackson Associate Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies University of Michigan Black Orientalism: Genesis, Purpose, and Significance for American Professor Jackson received his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 1990. He is the author of Islamic Law and the State: The Constitutional Jurisprudence of Shihâb al-Dîn al-Qarâfî (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1996) and On the Boundaries of Theological Tolerance in Islam: Abû Hâmid al-Ghazâlî’s Faysal al-Tafriqa Bayna al-Islam wa al-Zandaqa (Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2002). Currently, he is working on a book tentatively titled Islam and the Black American.

May 12, 2003
from 04:30 PM to 06:00 PM

Co-sponsored with Center for History, Society, and Culture; Davis Humanities Institute; Department of Anthropology; Department of History; Institute of Governmental Affairs

For more information contact Baki Tezcan: btezcan@ucdavis.edu

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