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You are here: Home / Academics & Advising / Past Course Lists / 2012-2013 / Spring 2013

Spring 2013

SPRING QUARTER 2013

To view the extended Course Descriptions Listing, Please CLICK HERE

To view ME/SA Course Lists from past Quarters Please CLICK HERE

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

CRN Course
Instructor
Title Location Day Time
62927 ANT 142 S. Joseph Peoples Middle East Young 184 MW 10:00-11:20 AM
31941 ANT 145 S. Srinivas South Asia Haring 2016 WF 12:10-2:00 PM

 

ARABIC 

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
32321 ARB 003 S. Hassouna Elementary Arabic H Gym 290 MTWRF 9:00-9:50 AM
32322 ARB 003 S. Hassouna Elementary Arabic H Gym 290 MTWRF 10:00-10:50 AM
32323 ARB 023 S. Hassouna Intermediate Arabic Bainer 1128 MTWRF 12:10-1:00 PM
32324 ARB 123 J. Sharlet Advanced Arabic Physic 140 TR 1:40-3:00 PM
 
 

ART HISTORY

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
62662 AHI 1E H. Watenpaugh Islamic Art Art 217 TR 9:00-10:20 AM
    Everson 157 M 9:00-9:50 AM
62663 AHI 1E H. Watenpaugh Islamic Art Art 217 TR 9:00-10:20 AM
Everson 157 T 12:10-1:00 PM
62664 AHI 1E H. Watenpaugh Islamic Art Art 217 TR 9:00-10:20 AM
Everson 157 T 1:10-2:00 PM

Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of Art History 1E.

CLASSICS

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
62380 CLA 001 T. Brelinski Near East & Early Greece Art 204 MWF 9:00-9:50 AM

Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of Classics 1

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
62640 COM 053B A. Venkatesan Literature of India/SE Asia Wellman 25 MW 12:10-1:00 PM

Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of Comparative Literature 53B.

 

HEBREW

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
46488 HEB 003 G. Franco Elementary Hebrew Olson 244 MTWF 9:00-9:50 AM
Olson 244 R 9:00-9:50 AM
63232 HEB 023 G. Franco Intermediate Modern Hebrew Wellman 5 MTWRF 11:00-11:50 AM

Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of Hebrew 3

Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of Hebrew 23

 

HINDI

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
46489 HIN 003 P. Chauhan Elementary Hindi/Urdu Wellman 211 MTWRF 10:00-10:50 AM
46490 HIN 003 P. Chauhan Elementary Hindi/Urdu Wellman 211 MTWRF 11:00-11:50 AM
46491 HIN 023 P. Chauhan Intermediate Hindi/Urdu Wellman 211 MTWRF 12:10-1:00 PM 

Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of Hindi 3, and 23.

 

HISTORY

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
62691 HIS 102Q S. Sen India Soc Sci 4202 W 2:10-5:00 PM
63215 HIS 102R B. Tezcan Muslim Societies Soc Sci 2202 M 9:00-12:00 PM
62712 HIS 196B S. Sen India Olson 146 TR 4:40-6:00 PM







Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of History 102Q, 102R, and 196B.

 
 

MIDDLE EAST/SOUTH ASIA STUDIES

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
62863 MSA 150 Z. Zaatari Women & Islamic Discourse Veihmeyer 116 MW 2:10-4:00 PM
62708 MSA 180 O. El Shakry ME/SA Selected Themes Haring 2016 TR 3:10-4:30 PM
Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of ME/SA Studies 150 and 180.

MUSIC

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
51701 MUS 148 R. Sahai, K. Lee Hindustani Ensemble Art Annex M 4:10-6:00 PM

 Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of Music 148.

WOMEN'S STUDIES

CRN Course Instructor Title Location Day Time
62784 WMS 185 Z. Zaatari Women & Islamic Discourse Veihmeyer 116 MW 2:10-4:00 PM

 Please Click Here for the Extended Course Description of Women's Studies 185.

 

Extended Course Descriptions for Spring 2013

Anthropology

 

142. Peoples of the Middle East (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite:course 2. Peoples of the Middle East (including North Africa). Discussions of class relations, kinship organization, sex/gender systems, religious beliefs and behavior, ethnic relations, political systems. Impact of world systems, political and religious movements and social change. (Former course 136.)

GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt.  Suad Joseph   

145. Performance, Embodiment, and Space in South Asia (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 2 or consent of instructor. South Asian cultures and societies with a focus on performance, embodiment, and space from several disciplinary fields. Topics may include colonialism, nationalism, religious traditions, media, popular culture, cities, social movements, modernity, body-cultures, identity, gender, and diasporas. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt.—III. Smriti Srinivas

 

Arabic

 

3. Elementary Arabic 3 (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 and 2 or with consent of instructor after taking all components of the final exam for course 1 and 2. Continues introduction to basic Arabic from courses 1 and 2. Interactive and integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including syntax. Focus on standard Arabic with limited use of spoken Egyptina and /or one other colloquial dialect.  Shayma Hassouna

23. Intermediate Arabic 23 (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 22 or with consent of instructor after completing all parts of the final exams for courses 21 and 22. Continues from courses 21 and 22. Interactive and integrated presentation of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, including idiomatic expression. Focus on standard Arabic with limited use of Egyptian and/or one other colloquial dialect. Shayma Hassouna

**123. Advanced Arabic (4)

Jocelyn Sharlet 
TR 1:40-3       CRN: 32324
GE credit: AH, WC.—III. (III.)

In Spring 2013, we will work on material from the end of Book Two of al-Kitaab fiiTa’allum al-‘Arabiyya so that students can develop advanced skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. The course will include limited use of Levantine colloquial Arabic, but the focus is on Modern Standard Arabic. Depending on student interests, we will also use materials from Book Three or read short selections from editorials from al-Jazira or short stories in Arabic. These materials will be provided with a vocabulary list, an audio recording, discussion questions about the text, and a review and guide to grammatical concepts in the text. Students who have not taken ARB 122 but are able to handle material from the middle of the textbook will be able to take 123 with the instructor's approval.

Art History

 

**1E. Islamic Art and Architecture

This course introduces the art, architecture and urbanism of societies where Muslims were dominant or where they formed significant minorities from the 7th through the 20th centuries CE. It examines the form and function of architectural settings and works of art; attributed to art by users. The course follows a chronological order, where selected visual materials are treated along chosen themes. Themes included the creation of a distinctive visual culture in the emerging Islamic polity; the development of urban institutions; key architectural types such as mosques, madras (college of law), caravanserai, dervish lodge; the arts of the illustrated book; courtly art objects; self-representation; cultural interconnections along trade pilgrimage routes; westernization and modernization in art and architecture.  Heghnar Watenpaugh

 

Classics

 

1. The Ancient Near East and Early Greece:

3000-500 B.C.E. (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Introduction to the literature,art, and social and political institutions of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Palestine, and early Greece from 3000 to 500 B.C.E. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—(II.) Bulman

 

Comparative Literature

 

 

COM 6: Myth and Legend (4)

Jocelyn Sharlet

Spring 2013

TR 3:10-4:30 1001 Giedt

Lecture 3 hours; discussion 1 hour

 

This course explores how communities have used myth and legend in folklore that became major works of literature. We will investigate the role of myth and legend in articulating different perspectives on communal identity and ethical values. Myth and legend in these literary works express ideas about conflicting obligations, insiders and outsiders, and humankind as it relates to the natural world and the supernatural. We will analyze how these issues are inflected by gender and the family in conjunction with politics, as well as the role of negotiation and violence in responding to competition within and between communities. 

GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—I, II. (I, II.)

 

Books available in the bookstore:

Abolqasem Ferdowsi, Shahnameh: The Persian Book of Kings, tr. Davis (Penguin Classics, 2007)

The Book of Dede Korkut: A Turkish Epic, tr. Sumer, Uysal and Walker (University of Texas Press, 1991)

Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali, revised edition, tr. Niane (Pearson, 2006)

Song of the Cid: A Dual-Language Edition with Parallel Text, tr. Raffel (Penguin Classics, 2009)

 

Texts available in a reader that will be posted on the course site:

David of Sassoun: Armenian Folk Epic, tr. Artin K. Shalian (English translation, New York, 1964)

Bani Hilal: The Birth of Abu Zayd, Arabic folk epic recorded and translated in Egypt by Dwight Reynolds

 

COM 53B. Literature of India and Southeast Asia (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to representative masterpieces of South Asia with readings from such works as the Mahabharata and Ramayana, The Cloud Messenger, Shakuntala, The Little Clay Cart, and the stories and poems of both ancient and modern India and Southeast Asia. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt. Venkatesan

 

Hebrew

3. Elementary Hebrew (5)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; laboratory—1 hour Prerequisite: course 2 or the equivalent. Speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing fundamentals of modern Hebrew.—III. (III.)

23. Intermediate Modern Hebrew III (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 22 or consent of instructor. Continued development and refinement of grammar, composition, and language skills required for reading literary texts and conversing about contemporary topics at an advanced level. History of the Hebrew language. Further development of writing and translating skills. Not open to students who have taken course 100C or 102.—III. (III.)

Hindi

3. Elementary Hindi/Urdu III (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 2. An introduction to Hindi and Urdu in which students will learn vocabulary and grammar in both Devanagari and Urdu scripts, and will practice skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening.—III. (III.)

23. Intermediate Hindi/Urdu III (5)

Lecture/discussion—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 22. An intermediate level course where students will continue to practice their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Hindi and Urdu.—III. (III.)

History

102 Q or R. Undergraduate Proseminar in History (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. (A) Ancient; (B) Medieval; (D) Modern Europe to 1815; (E) Europe since 1815; (F) Russia; (G) China to 1800; (H) China since 1800; (I) Britain; (J) Latin America since 1810; (K) American History to 1787; (L) United States, 1787-1896; (M) United States since 1896; (N) Japan; (O) Africa; (P) Christianity and Culture in Europe, 50-1850; (Q) India; (R) Muslim Societies; (X) Comparative History, selected topics in cultural, political, economic, and social history that deal comparatively with more than one geographic field. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment. 

196B. Modern India (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of cultural, social, economic, and

political aspects of South Asian history from arrival of the British in the eighteenth century to formation of new independent states—India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan—in the twentieth century. GE credit: Soc- Sci, Div, Wrt.   Sudipta Sen

ME/SA Studies

150. Women & Islamic Discourses (4)

Introduction to the debates/discourses about women and Islam.  Transformations in debates/discourses in colonial and postcolonial periods in the Middle East & South Asia. Comparative study of debates/discourses on family, work, law, sexuality, religion,  comportment, human rights, feminist and religious movements. Suad Joseph

180. Topics in Middle East and South Asian Studies (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing.  This course will be a thematic exploration of modernity in the Middle East and South Asia as a historical, political, cultural, and spatial experience. We will explore topics such as Orientalism; the colonial encounter; political technologies; tradition and modernity; caste and class; decolonization; gender and sexuality; religion and piety; youth and cities; and visual and popular culture. The focus of our readings will be on the intersection of colonialism and modernity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the formulation of a postcolonial national modernity. We will explore contexts as diverse as: Algeria, Egypt, India, Iran, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Yemen.

Music

148. Hindustani Vocal Ensemble (2)

Rehearsal—2 hours. Basics of Hindustani music through theory and practice. Fundamentals of raga (mode) and tala (rhythms) with special emphasis on improvisation, a central feature of khyal (singing style). Five ragas each quarter. May be repeated up to six times for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II.(I, II.)

Women's Studies

 

**185. Women & Islamic Discourses (4)

Introduction to the debates/discourses about women and Islam.  Transformations in debates/discourses in colonial and postcolonial periods in the Middle East & South Asia. Comparative study of debates/discourses on family, work, law, sexuality, religion, comportment, human rights, feminist and religious movements. Suad Joseph

 

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